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City Highlights

Art/Museums

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Mori Art Museum (1) is located on the 53rd floor of the Mori Tower. It aims to take the lead in introducing the newest art from Asia and other regions of the world, with a key emphasis on the concepts of being contemporary and international.
Edo-Tokyo Museum (2) has a replica of the Nihombashi Bridge leading to the permanent exhibit covering more than 400 years of history. Special exhibitions serve as projections into living in the future.
Tokyo National Museum (3) exhibits some 4,000 outstanding works at a time from its 110,000-piece collection: paintings, calligraphy, sculpture, decorative arts, archaeology, etc.
The National Art Center, Tokyo (4) is a unique and innovative art exhibition facility, one of the largest in Japan at 14,000 square meters. Along with various art exhibitions, the center promotes outreach activities through educational programs, along with a library.
Nezu Museum was re-opened in 2009, designed by Kengo Kuma, and aims to allow this generation to experience the beauty of the past while preserving the legacy and moving towards the future.
Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo holds regular themed exhibitions based on its collection of some 4,500 works to reveal varying angles to contemporary art, and inviting special exhibitions.
Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum re-opened in 2010, and preserved the original design of 1894. Exhibitions are on art from the late 19th to the first half of the 20th century, and focus on the interaction between art and cities in the modern era.

Japanese Gardens

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The Imperial Palace’s 210,000-square-meter East Gardens, with vast lawn and a preserved Japanese garden, is where the principal, second and third compounds were in the Edo Period (1603-1868).
Hama-rikyu Gardens (1) are located at the mouth of the Sumida River, with entrances at the Otemon Gate (Shimbashi) and Nakanogomon Gate (Shiodome). There is a teahouse and a tidal pond, common elements of a feudal lord’s residence.
Shinjuku Gyoen (2) was the former site of a private mansion owned by Lord Naito. The 58.3ha with a 3.5km circumference blends three styles of garden – French formal, English landscape and Japanese traditional.
Rikugi-en (3) offers a mountain and pond-style garden typical of the Edo Period. There are 6,020 tall and 28,700 short trees. The 87,809 square meters include a large weeping cherry tree, garden hills, teahouses from Meiji (1868-1912), and small island of stone.
The 17th-century Koishikawa-Korakuen has a very strong Chinese flavor. Only eight other Japan premises have both the Special Place of scenic beauty and the Special Historic site appointments. The garden, central pond and hills are wonderful for a quiet stroll. The “Full Moon” bridge and garden reproduction of Saiko Lake have Chinese cultural origins.

Fashion & Architecture

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Maison Hermès (Renzo Piano) in Ginza is the flagship boutique, and also includes a theater, gallery, café, offices and roof garden. The façade of specially designed, fabricated glass (45x45cm blocks) create a translucent “magic lantern,” influenced by the Japanese paper lantern.
Chanel (Peter Marino and Associates Architects) in Ginza houses a three-story boutique, gallery, concert venue, offices, and Michelin-star Beige Alain Ducasse Tokyo restaurant. The 65.5m-tall, 10-story façade is transparent in daylight and translucent at night.
Armani / Ginza Tower (Doriana and Massimiliano Fuksas) includes the boutique, wine lounge, ristorante, and spa. The permeability of the exterior surface is softened by a cascade of brightly LED-lit leaves that are adjusted in intensity and color to the time of day or season.
Prada Aoyama (1) (Herzog & de Meuron) is a six-floor, five-sided polyhedral structure, taking in the surroundings. Steel defines the three cores, horizontal tubes and diagrid external frame. The windows are a variation between flat and transparent, convex, concave or etched.
TOD’S (2) (Toyo Ito) in Omotesando is a slender, L-shaped structure that fits right in along the tree-lined wide street. Sharply angled concrete long beams seemingly wrap the exterior composed of polygonal glass plates over the Italian shoe store’s surface.

Shopping

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Shibuya (1) remains the youth trendsetting area in fashion. The latest is Shibuya Hikarie, and its theater for overseas musicals, retail / restaurant space over 11 floors.
Shinjuku (2) is home to behemoth department stores, connected to the world’s largest train station (Keio), across the street (Odakyu) or nearby an exit (Takashimaya Times Square, Isetan).
The Ginza (3) shopping district is very popular, with major department stores offering fashion, accessories, cosmetics, beauty care, lifestyle, foods, restaurants, traditional Japanese arts and crafts. Matsuya (since 1925) has its LED-lit façade, and the brass lions guard the entrance of Mitsukoshi (since 1930). The clock tower of Wako (since 1932) remains an icon at the famous intersection. Printemps is a Paris-based chain.
Akihabara remains Tokyo’s Electric Town and also the center of Japan’s otaku anime and manga culture. Hundreds of outlets have staff who are multilingual, and duty-free shopping options.
Roppongi Hills has over 200 restaurants, cafés, boutiques and event spaces, art museum and gallery, Cineplex and observation deck. Close by is Tokyo Midtown mall that resonates with the theme of urban living, airy event spaces, and park.
Odaiba along the waterfront has DiverCity Tokyo Plaza, Aquacity, and Decks that offer floors of global brand boutiques, themed restaurants, indoor entertainment spaces, a Cineplex and spectacular views.

High Tech

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Miraikan (1&3) along the Tokyo waterfront is the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation. There are exhibitions and events sponsored by corporations and research organizations (1F); ASIMO Demonstration featuring a Humanoid Robot (3F); permanent interactive exhibition on creating your future, library, and workshops (3F); 3D real-time globe (3-5F); exhibit on exploring frontiers and VR Theater (5F); and dome theater (6F).
Panasonic Center Tokyo near Tokyo Bay is where eco-friendly technology is explored, such as smart solutions designed for sustainability and the eco ideas House for a sustainable lifestyle (1F and annex); experience-oriented museum related to science and math, and a Nintendo game center (2F).
MEGA WEB (2) is located along the Tokyo waterfront, and is a theme park and the world’s largest auto showroom featuring some 140 vehicles from Toyota Motor’s current models; a Hybrid car zone with motor-assisted hybrid carts for kids on a 150m circuit.
Sony Building in Ginza is a showcase of modern technology in the latest Sony products to see, touch and try; and Communication Zone OPUS (8F) to experience highest-quality video and audio entertainment.

Art/Museums

  • 1
  • 2
    3
  • 4
Mori Art Museum (1) is located on the 53rd floor of the Mori Tower. It aims to take the lead in introducing the newest art from Asia and other regions of the world, with a key emphasis on the concepts of being contemporary and international.
Edo-Tokyo Museum (2) has a replica of the Nihombashi Bridge leading to the permanent exhibit covering more than 400 years of history. Special exhibitions serve as projections into living in the future.
Tokyo National Museum (3) exhibits some 4,000 outstanding works at a time from its 110,000-piece collection: paintings, calligraphy, sculpture, decorative arts, archaeology, etc.
The National Art Center, Tokyo (4) is a unique and innovative art exhibition facility, one of the largest in Japan at 14,000 square meters. Along with various art exhibitions, the center promotes outreach activities through educational programs, along with a library.
Nezu Museum was re-opened in 2009, designed by Kengo Kuma, and aims to allow this generation to experience the beauty of the past while preserving the legacy and moving towards the future.
Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo holds regular themed exhibitions based on its collection of some 4,500 works to reveal varying angles to contemporary art, and inviting special exhibitions.
Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum re-opened in 2010, and preserved the original design of 1894. Exhibitions are on art from the late 19th to the first half of the 20th century, and focus on the interaction between art and cities in the modern era.

Japanese Gardens

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
The Imperial Palace’s 210,000-square-meter East Gardens, with vast lawn and a preserved Japanese garden, is where the principal, second and third compounds were in the Edo Period (1603-1868).
Hama-rikyu Gardens (1) are located at the mouth of the Sumida River, with entrances at the Otemon Gate (Shimbashi) and Nakanogomon Gate (Shiodome). There is a teahouse and a tidal pond, common elements of a feudal lord’s residence.
Shinjuku Gyoen (2) was the former site of a private mansion owned by Lord Naito. The 58.3ha with a 3.5km circumference blends three styles of garden – French formal, English landscape and Japanese traditional.
Rikugi-en (3) offers a mountain and pond-style garden typical of the Edo Period. There are 6,020 tall and 28,700 short trees. The 87,809 square meters include a large weeping cherry tree, garden hills, teahouses from Meiji (1868-1912), and small island of stone.
The 17th-century Koishikawa-Korakuen has a very strong Chinese flavor. Only eight other Japan premises have both the Special Place of scenic beauty and the Special Historic site appointments. The garden, central pond and hills are wonderful for a quiet stroll. The “Full Moon” bridge and garden reproduction of Saiko Lake have Chinese cultural origins.

Fashion & Architecture

  • 1
  • 2
Maison Hermès (Renzo Piano) in Ginza is the flagship boutique, and also includes a theater, gallery, café, offices and roof garden. The façade of specially designed, fabricated glass (45x45cm blocks) create a translucent “magic lantern,” influenced by the Japanese paper lantern.
Chanel (Peter Marino and Associates Architects) in Ginza houses a three-story boutique, gallery, concert venue, offices, and Michelin-star Beige Alain Ducasse Tokyo restaurant. The 65.5m-tall, 10-story façade is transparent in daylight and translucent at night.
Armani / Ginza Tower (Doriana and Massimiliano Fuksas) includes the boutique, wine lounge, ristorante, and spa. The permeability of the exterior surface is softened by a cascade of brightly LED-lit leaves that are adjusted in intensity and color to the time of day or season.
Prada Aoyama (1) (Herzog & de Meuron) is a six-floor, five-sided polyhedral structure, taking in the surroundings. Steel defines the three cores, horizontal tubes and diagrid external frame. The windows are a variation between flat and transparent, convex, concave or etched.
TOD’S (2) (Toyo Ito) in Omotesando is a slender, L-shaped structure that fits right in along the tree-lined wide street. Sharply angled concrete long beams seemingly wrap the exterior composed of polygonal glass plates over the Italian shoe store’s surface.

Shopping

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
Shibuya (1) remains the youth trendsetting area in fashion. The latest is Shibuya Hikarie, and its theater for overseas musicals, retail / restaurant space over 11 floors.
Shinjuku (2) is home to behemoth department stores, connected to the world’s largest train station (Keio), across the street (Odakyu) or nearby an exit (Takashimaya Times Square, Isetan).
The Ginza (3) shopping district is very popular, with major department stores offering fashion, accessories, cosmetics, beauty care, lifestyle, foods, restaurants, traditional Japanese arts and crafts. Matsuya (since 1925) has its LED-lit façade, and the brass lions guard the entrance of Mitsukoshi (since 1930). The clock tower of Wako (since 1932) remains an icon at the famous intersection. Printemps is a Paris-based chain.
Akihabara remains Tokyo’s Electric Town and also the center of Japan’s otaku anime and manga culture. Hundreds of outlets have staff who are multilingual, and duty-free shopping options.
Roppongi Hills has over 200 restaurants, cafés, boutiques and event spaces, art museum and gallery, Cineplex and observation deck. Close by is Tokyo Midtown mall that resonates with the theme of urban living, airy event spaces, and park.
Odaiba along the waterfront has DiverCity Tokyo Plaza, Aquacity, and Decks that offer floors of global brand boutiques, themed restaurants, indoor entertainment spaces, a Cineplex and spectacular views.

High Tech

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
Miraikan (1&3) along the Tokyo waterfront is the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation. There are exhibitions and events sponsored by corporations and research organizations (1F); ASIMO Demonstration featuring a Humanoid Robot (3F); permanent interactive exhibition on creating your future, library, and workshops (3F); 3D real-time globe (3-5F); exhibit on exploring frontiers and VR Theater (5F); and dome theater (6F).
Panasonic Center Tokyo near Tokyo Bay is where eco-friendly technology is explored, such as smart solutions designed for sustainability and the eco ideas House for a sustainable lifestyle (1F and annex); experience-oriented museum related to science and math, and a Nintendo game center (2F).
MEGA WEB (2) is located along the Tokyo waterfront, and is a theme park and the world’s largest auto showroom featuring some 140 vehicles from Toyota Motor’s current models; a Hybrid car zone with motor-assisted hybrid carts for kids on a 150m circuit.
Sony Building in Ginza is a showcase of modern technology in the latest Sony products to see, touch and try; and Communication Zone OPUS (8F) to experience highest-quality video and audio entertainment.
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